So, you read Twilight…

So, you’ve read Twilight, Harry Potter, and The Hunger Games. But, you’re entering your mid-twenties and you’d like to read something more… adult. Am I correct in making that assumption? And, provided you have taste, you won’t be heading down the road of ghost-written generilit. But, you’ve tried this or that book, hither and yon, near and far, and you haven’t found books that have really given you that oompha you had when reading the children’s book. You like some of the tropes, perhaps –love triangles, chosen-ones, the hero’s journey, spunky main characters (well, for the HP and HG fans, anyway), magic, monsters, dystopian worlds, political satire, angst, gothic trappings…
Never fear! Pushy Librarians ™ to the rescue! Pushy Librarians are here to encourage you (aggressively) to read new and exciting books. And, since Pushy Librarians are grotesquely well-read, we can suggest books that are JUST right for YOU.

So… you like Twilight. Judgements about your taste in romances aside, we actually would like to make a brave stance and say: We understand. Sure we do. Life can be boring. Why not a world where danger can happen but, no, not really? Nothing dreadful really happens. Romance is forever. Romance is exciting. Everyone wants you. You’re hot and all the boys in town, follow you all around… After we’re done singing The Carpenters, we must say, you’re in luck! A lot of great books actually have all the angst, love triangles, forbidden desires, monsters, gothic romance, and vampiric lore you love to escape into!

wuthering heights
1. Wuthering Heights by Emily Bronte
Wuthering Heights is quintessentially angsty and moody. It has that setting, the dreary moors, the crumbly, old estates, a place where the wind howls and fog clings to the ground… Well, you get the idea. It also has one of the most epic tales of doomed love and revenge in the entire canon of literature. And, of course, it makes it even juicier to know that it was originally condemned for immorality in its time. The characters are Heathcliff, a gypsy orphan, adopted into a rich family, but forever mistreated by the children and heirs. He is in love with his adopted sister, Cathy, a wild-child, beautiful, adored, and unfaithful. Together they… ruin everyone’s lives. And how that ruin unfolds, falling apart so beautifully into corruption, violence and tragedy. Oh, and possible ghosts.

romeo and juliet
2. Romeo and Juliet by our man, the Bard! (Fanfare)
The ultimate in teen-angst. It’s about forbidden desires, and the wonderfulness of desire, and desiring desire, and desiring forbidden desire, and falling in love, and falling in love with love. Sure, they’re flighty, brash, and immature, but aren’t all teenagers? And the fact that they can’t be together just makes their brash, young love all the more passionate. It really is tragic, too, if you let go of some of your contemporary condemnation for their relationship and just go with the heady emotions of youth. And the dialog! Juliet is one of the wittiest characters in Shakespeare, and has some of the best lines you’ll ever read. No stammering Bella Swan here!

pride-and-prejudice-book
3. Pride and Prejudice by Jane Austen
Supposedly, Twilight (the first book) is sort of, kind of a re-telling of this story. It has the two main characters who meet and, oh, no, there’s misunderstanding, they don’t like each other, she doesn’t know why he’s so rude and standoffish… There’s some great tension in the scenes of will-they-won’t-they (oh, who are we kidding? They will!), but it’s more than just a romance. It’s also a drama of social norms and laws, a woman’s place in the world, and the dangers of misplaced trusts and misplaced doubts. But, don’t worry, there’s a love story in the end!

Trilby
4. Trilby by George du Maurier
It’s the bohemian revolution in Paris! (Cue your Moulin Rouge…) The artists and poets are all doing their arty, poety thing, and in the midst is Trilby. She’s a cute, quirky heroine, like every character Zooey Deschanel ever played. She’s a foot-model (okay… that’s kinda weird), and she can’t sing worth anything. Like, at all. Aw, see, it’s like Bella’s clumsiness, except that Trilby’s a LIKABLE heroine! And, yes, I’m not exaggerating her adorableness. There was a huge fandom for Trilby back in the day. She falls in love with a rich boy who… leaves her. Models aren’t so chic in those days. When he comes back, she has the voice of an angel and performs for adoring crowds. How? Well, she’s under the thrall of the mysterious musician, Svengali, who may have her in some kind of a spell. While the straight interpretation is… very anti-semetic, in light of He Who Comes Later you can really see Svengali as a Byronic Hero, an Other, outside society, whose genius could have blossomed if only people weren’t so prejudiced and…

Phantom_of_the_Opera_Cover
5. Yeah. Phantom of the Opera by Gaston Leroux
So, it’s based on Trilby, but you knew this was coming. Or, at least, I hope you did. This book is pure Gothalicious, angsty whipped topping in a crystal bowl. The author was a Gothic fanboy who loved reading Poe and who also wrote pulp fiction serials. He wanted to elevate pulp fiction to a literary status, because he loved the melodrama of it. He liked how this trait is in old, Gothic Romantic stories, like Poe, or The Monk, or The Castle of Ontronto… He also liked lifting ideas and putting them in his story, filling the story with winking nods to Gothic literature’s melodrama and overly-stylized dialog… I think he and Tarantino would have been friends… And, Phantom was his assemblage-piece of fanfictiony homages to Poe and other Gothic writers. As a pulp fiction serial. And it is wonderful. By wonderful, of course, I mean campy, excessively angsty, almost cute with knowing references to other media (Red Death is only the beginning), full of really beautifully terrible dialog, and characters that the world has decided we need to see over, and over, and over again. It’s not just the Beauty and the Beast aspects, or the love triangle, it’s really the Phantom. Imagine of Edward looked like Skeletor, was super smart, a great artist and musician, could sing, had a sense of humor, slept in a real coffin (yeah…), had glowing eyes, strangled people, and was basically nothing like Edward. But, he’s a badass. How bad? Once, he was played by Freddy Kruger. Bad. Ass.
Oh, and Freud and Jung. All over this.

cyrano
6. Cyrano de Bergerac by Edmund Rostand
Or, maybe you want your love triangles with more tragic love among good people and less crazy, Freudian violence? Cyrano is about a dashing soldier/poet with a long nose that he thinks means no woman would love him. Roxanne is a beautiful, and actually quite nice, woman who loves poetry. Christian is a handsome but slow-witted man. Cyrano sets Christian up with Roxanne, using Cyrano’s poetry. Love, war, tragedy, and poetry commence. And it is beautiful!

Carmilla
7. Carmilla by le Fanu
So, we’ve been neglecting an important aspect, you might notice. Vampires. Well, fear not! Carmilla is a very strange, little book. It’s written before Dracula, and le Fanu does a surprisingly good job and writing from the point of view of a woman. It’s set in a castle (do you even have to ask?), where live a lovely girl and her father. But, when a carriage containing a mysterious woman and her daughter crashes, the daughter ends up staying at the castle for… reasons. And this is Carmilla, beautiful, alluring, languid, pale, sexy, and totally undead. Delicious undead goodness ensues.

EdwardGoreyDraculaBlog1
8. Dracula by Bram Stoker
So, you knew this one was coming. What can we even say that hasn’t already been said about the most popular horror character of all time? He’s dastardly, but strangely tragic. He’s horrifying, but alluring. He can turn into a bat, a wolf, and fog, can’t see his reflection, is repulsed by garlic, sleeps in a coffin, and dies when getting staked in the heart: he’s a real vampire! Aside from being a complete badass (he kills an entire ship, and it is absolutely, mind-numbingly terrifying!), he’s also sneaky, slippery, and can get you when you’re asleep! Even if you pull your covers all the way over your head and your toes don’t even stick out the other side, and you have your favorite bear and… I need to get more garlic.

anne_rice_books
9. The Vampire Chronicles by Anne Rice
The original in sympathetic vampires, this is sort of a polarizing series. Either you think it’s awesome for being a literary series about vampires, or you think it’s pretentious melodrama. But, either way, it’s worth giving a go for the sheer cultural punch it offers. Every vampire story around today owes something to Rice and her creations. Hell, without Rice, there’d probably be no Buffy. And, without Buffy, Joss Whedon may not be the cultural icon he is today. Wrap your minds around that one, fanboys and fangirls! But, aside from this, Rice doesn’t just give us angsty, sympathetic monsters. She gives us monsters with culture, with monster dreams, with monster goals, with traditions and expectations, and an entire universe, who ponder philosophical quandaries about their existence and who… make rock bands. Okay, it may not be for everyone, but if you like vampire stories, it’s worth giving a go.

nin
10. Collages by Anais Nin
Anais Nin: exotic, romantic, frank, whimsical, philosophical, beautiful, hypnotic… There’s a lot to say about this woman, and a lot many people have said about her. This is one of her easier books to digest, and still will probably impress all your bookish friends who teased you for liking Twilight. It really is a collage, of memories and moments, intertwined in pure poetry. It’s like a long, feverish dream that you do not want to end. At times heartbreaking, at times sweeping with desire, at times repugnant, it’s always a pleasure of forbidden fruits, passion, tragedy, delight, and sense of self. Never pretentious and always entertaining, Collages is the perfect read for someone wanting that tingly feeling of reading a book saturated in the colors of passion.

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